When Sports Overwhelm

Overwhelm My girls both play sports competitively. It means we spend a lot of time and money for them to play. And that's fine. It's a choice we've made to let our girls follow their passions. But there comes a moment when we have to say enough is enough. We reached that point this summer.

My older daughter wanted to play on two soccer teams this fall, upping her league games from eight to 16. She also wanted to try out for the Olympic Development Program for our state. My younger daughter spent the summer traveling to Minnesota to play hockey on a girls' team. It was not the best experience for her or us. The local hockey program recently told us they're changing the program for the fall and doing away with the minimal travel option they've had in the past. Her options now are to play recreational hockey or to play on a team that double the travel and the cost of last year.

My husband and I have finally decided to say enough is enough. We miss our family. We miss going on vacation to a place that doesn't involve the girls playing games. We miss having weekends at home. We're still willing to support our kids in their sports, but we're no longer willing to simply go along with the crowd. We're no longer willing to have our lives and our marriage consumed by constantly going in different directions.

Don't get me wrong, our girls will still be playing their sports. We'll just be a bit more judicious about the choices we make. Our older daughter is not double rostering this fall or trying out for the Olympic Development Program. Our younger daughter won't be playing on the travel team.

Because, here's the thing: I can't raise my kids and create a family unit if my family is constantly split up going in separate directions. I can't "train up a child in the way he should go (Proverbs 22:6)" if my kids are never around me. I can't teach my kids about God "when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up (Deuteronomy 6:7)" if I'm never doing those things with my kids.

It's hard to tell our kids no, especially when everyone they know is doing the things they want to be doing. However, sometimes we have to make the tough decisions that protect our families -- even if it comes at the expense of upsetting our kids.

In our community, it's really easy to get trapped in the idea that our kids will be "behind" if they don't get the right training or spend the right number of hours playing their sport, learning an instrument or doing another activity. It's easy to get caught up trying to "keep up with the Joneses."

But isn't it more important that we teach our kids the things they're going to need to know to live their lives following God? Isn't it more important that we be the ones pouring wisdom and love into them while they're in our care?

The days we have to raise our kids are fleeting, and we need to choose how to use those days well. Sometimes that means pulling back and creating space and time to do that.